L.U.C.A.: O Começo (2021) poster
7.3
Sua Avaliação: 0/10
Avaliações: 7.3/10 de 4,702 usuários
# de Fãs: 14,270
Resenhas: 53 usuários
Classificado #7179
Popularidade #1210
Fãs 4,702

Editar Tradução

  • Português (Portugal)
  • Русский
  • Türkçe
  • Italiano
  • País: South Korea
  • Tipo: Drama
  • Episódios: 12
  • Exibido: Fev 1, 2021 - Mar 9, 2021
  • Exibido em: Segunda, Terça
  • Original Network: tvN
  • Duração: 1 hr. 15 min.
  • Pontuação: 7.3 (scored by 4,702 usuários)
  • Classificado: #7179
  • Popularidade: #1210
  • Classificação do Conteúdo: 15+ - Teens 15 or older

Onde assistir L.U.C.A.: O Começo

Viki
Grátis (sub)
WeTV
Grátis (sub)
Tubi
Grátis (sub)
TVING
Subscription
iQIYI
Grátis (sub)

Elenco e Créditos

Resenhas

Completados
WandereR
40 pessoas acharam esta resenha útil
Mar 10, 2021
12 of 12 episódios vistos
Completados 14
No geral 7.0
História 7.5
Acting/Cast 8.0
Musical 9.0
Voltar a ver 4.0

Experimental Science

Intriguing plot… innovative concept… poor execution… but great music. This sums up for me the entire experience of watching this drama and why I rated it a 7. For more details, please read on…

LUCA: The Beginning is based on the premise of scientists creating a new species of mankind by integrating the DNA of several different animals that makes this breed of humans stronger, faster, more resilient to the ravages of time and nature, along with superpowers to boot. These experiments are backed by a shadowy entity, called “The Establishment”, with seemingly unlimited resources and broad influence that stretches far and wide into the upper echelons of government and subsidiaries in various industries. One such subsidiary fronts itself as a “Church” where its mysterious cult following is headed by a villainous woman who styles herself as the prophet for the second coming of “Messiah” – the new human hybrid. Enter Zi-O, the first of such hybrids.

The drama chronicles Zi-O’s journey from being a lab experiment to escaping the clutches of this cult while adapting and finally learning what it truly means to be human. Along the way, he encounters the intrepid policewoman Gu Reum, with whom he shares a connection to their past. Armed with the knowledge of the synopsis and having seen the captivating trailer, I started this show fully expecting a similar approach to Scarlett Johansson’s Lucy. It turned out rather differently, with mixed results.

The drama is decently-produced, reasonably well acted for the most part, but the plot and characters are quite inconsistently and illogically written. The special effects are nothing to write home about but generally well-rendered, in a minimalist manner, and mainly used to depict Zi-O’s electricity-charged superpower, and pyrotechnics for certain scenes. The production team is led by the hugely experienced director Kim Hong Seon, no stranger to dark thrillers, who helmed notable shows such as The Guest, Pied Piper, and Voice. The screenplay is written by Chun Sung Il, who mainly specialises in comedy with Chuno being the sole non-comedy tagged production in his repertoire of works. The cast contains a number of familiar faces the likes of Kim Rae Won, Kim Sung Oh, Kim Sang Ho, Park Hyuk Kwon, Ahn Nae Sang, and Jin Kyung. Look out for memorable guest appearances in the form of Lee Won Jong at the very beginning and Jung Eun Chae who had a more prominent role towards the end.

The drama starts out brightly at an engaging pace that’s filled with sporadic moments of thrills and intensity. Both leads’ backstories and shared connection are revealed little by little in every episode via numerous flashbacks. The tags for this show are spot on, where here we have mystery, melodrama, and romance in addition to the science-fiction and action. Watching this turned out to be quite an attritional viewing experience from around episode 3 onward and a pretty wild ride overall in what has been an emotional roller coaster, beyond what I had initially anticipated. It’s the kind of show where the good guys persistently get outwitted, take the (numerous) hits, fall down, get back up and repeat. Over and over again, like the wash cycle of a washing machine.

The scenario of our leads being incessantly chased by the same team of bad guys and the FL consistently getting beaten up and having her head bashed against the wall does get tedious up to the halfway point. As it turns out, for a normal female human without the additional exotic DNA, her skeletal structure is in no way less durable compared to the human hybrids because she emerges unscathed every time with nothing more than superficial wounds. As for the ML, given his inexperience in combat and lack of control over his superpowers, he ends up being constantly overpowered by the battle-hardened and ruthless professionally trained villains.

The pace slows down for three quarters of an episode just past the midway point where the FL temporarily ceases to suffer needlessly and, together with the ML, attain some much-deserved rest, among other questionable events that transpired. The momentum picks up again soon after and reached its zenith in the business end of the show where action, tragedy and more plot twists blended to produce the impetus for a thrillingly breath-taking and bitter conclusion to Zi-O and Gu Reum’s story arc as well as the overarching plot. Many viewers felt that the ending is an open one with a possibility of a second season but personally for me, it represented adequate closure where we allow ourselves to write our own epilogue to this whole affair.

I feel that the storytelling would have been more compelling with less episodes. The backstories and the plot set up dragged out more than was necessary, and included too much of the ceaseless running around and fighting (getting beaten up, more like) and meaningless sub-plots with unfulfilled romance undertones. Even with 12 episodes, certain character arcs remained unexplained and plot holes were littered throughout.

As far as the acting is concerned, Kim Rae Won and Lee Da Hee each gave a commendable portrayal of the main characters which were quite poorly conceived, in my opinion. The individual character development, (excessive) pain, and agony along with superfluous misunderstandings between them were frustrating. In particular the FL Ha Neul Ae Gu Reum (why they came up with such a long fictional name in the first place is beyond me) was written to be infuriatingly lacking in any common sense, or even the street-smarts as befits a police detective of her experience. This character continuously places her life and the lives of others in danger, and favours brawn over brains. The depiction of her taking on swarms of villains alone in unarmed combat throughout the entire show is utter nonsense and unrealistic.

The villains are an eclectic mix of characters. For me, Park Hyuk Kwon nailed it with his version of the unscrupulous and conniving NIS official Kim Cheol Soo. Whether as a protagonist or antagonist, he’s always enjoyable to watch due to his versatility and range. The award-winning Kim Sang Ho, as usual, is one of the best supporting actors in the industry. His characters are always layered and brilliantly portrayed, as is the case recently in Sweet Home and now here in this drama as the conflicted cop, Choi Jin Hwan. Jin Kyung’s cold blooded false prophet, Hwang Jung Ah, is rather theatrical and OTT at times but quite convincing especially when spouting sermons from the pulpit. Ahn Nae Sang’s role this time is a little more understated, as the lead scientist Ryu Joong Kwon. Kim Sung Oh’s Lee Son is largely one-dimensional with the stoic and cold exterior, except for that singular moment of tragic loss, a clichéd plot device, that he experiences towards the tail end of the show. Other than that, his main role is simply to inflict physical pain on others. Jung Eun Chae’s Attorney Jung is a scene-stealer, despite her limited guest role, and is actually rather fun to watch.

One of the very few pleasing aspects of this show which is done right, is the soundtrack. I thoroughly enjoyed every song in the album, in particular both the original and acoustic versions of the hauntingly evocative song, Your Eyes. Track listing as follows:
1. Sun Woo Jung A - Your Eyes
2. Jemma - LUCA
3. Lee Da Hee - Your Eyes (Acoustic)
4. KLANG - Gone

This show had so much potential to begin with, being based on a concept that is both innovative and refreshing. The entertaining and riveting start was unfortunately proven to be a false dawn. The production is hampered by the lack of quality screenplay and the resulting downward spiral of the storytelling finally culminated in a hugely incredulous and dissatisfying end.

Leia Mais

Esta resenha foi útil para você?
Completados
Marshmallow-Chocoholic
52 pessoas acharam esta resenha útil
Mar 9, 2021
12 of 12 episódios vistos
Completados 2
No geral 5.0
História 5.0
Acting/Cast 5.5
Musical 5.0
Voltar a ver 4.5

This Series Would Probably Have Been Put Together Better By A Single-Celled Organism...


With Kim Hong Seon, PD of masterpieces such as Voice and The Guest behind the works of the show , an ensemble of fairly talented actors ( not least Kim Rae Won, Kim Sang Ho Lee Da Hee and Kim Sung Oh) taking up the personae of screenwriter Chung Sung II ‘s characters( The Package,Your Honor), everything in relativity about “ L.U.C.A; The Beginning” screamed out " masterpiece" . Then, not even several episodes into the actual story, we find ourselves going down into the previously mentioned rabbit hole of cataclysmic screenwriting, which only seemed to crumble further into the abyss as the series went on...

The premiere episode of ‘ L.U.C.A’ did initially introduce some fairly innovative story writing techniques. The most evident offering hope for viewers to grow alongside our protagonist Zi O ( Kim Rae Won). Like our amnesiac main lead, we know little about Zi O’s world, identity and his mysterious link to detective Gu Reum ( Lee Da Hee). This should have by default allowed us to become attached to Zi O emotionally, had our hearts pulled out when he confronts the terrible and clandestine truths about his past and felt broken-heartedness to part with him and Gu Reum in the finale also.

Instead, trying to become attached to Zi O as a character even later on the show was fairly out of bounds for viewers . This is mainly because the characters lacked the innate, individualistic core of profound personality flaws and traits, rather than cliche plot mechanisms in order to keep a poorly-paced storyline motivated.

Whilst dramas often like to take the approach of the “ wild card” rebel trope in order to keep audiences entertained, this approach to Zi O soon began to collapse when every episode would follow this expected , fundamental structuring of Zi O having “ lost control of his powers again” or “ gone into a fit of rage” over a small (and often trivial) issue. It is not necessarily always a terrible approach to a character, but normally a show tends to foreground why this personality transition should be so shocking or surprising for viewers. Naturally, as we know little about his past, this aspect of knowing more about his identity , is drawn out of the question until later episodes. On the other hand, it is still interesting to note how Zi O’s character slowly begins to fall into the cesspit of lacklustre characterisation, even from his initial introduction in episode 1.

When Zi O is first introduced, he is notably marked as being “ different” by screenwriter Chung Sung II. He had few qualms over animal abuse , but somehow easily allowed his emotions to boil when someone who had grown close to him such as Gu Reum, was injured. This is not saying that Zi O should have remained an emotionless android in the drama, but it did seem peculiar for a character who struggled with emotional and psychological isolation over the course of the series, to suddenly see Zi O transitioning into emotional outbursts and tantrums. This can be mainly sourced to the problem of having few focal points over the course of the series which allowed Zi O to come to grips with his state of mind or mature as an individual.

It is important to address the controversial dilemma of miscasting for Zi O as well. Before anything else, it is important to state that Kim Rae Won is a good actor. However, Zi O as a written character respectfully felt slightly younger that Rae Won. This is not claiming that a “ fresher actor” would have been better at the role( as anyone would struggle with what was given to them by screenwriter Chung Sung II).Again, this is more the fault of poor casting than Won’s ability as an actor, however, it will certainly raise eyebrows for viewers to see a man nearing his 40s taking a temper tantrum as his character onscreen before storming off in order to ‘’ cool down’’.

This naturally draws us onto what led Gu Reum from being possibly one of the most profound female characters in a TVN drama, to a senseless cardboard cutout not even several episodes later. Gu-Reum is a character who was initially established as the “ advisory cop” archetype with a prolonged desire to find out what happened to her parents. It wasn’t honestly an original backstory, but it did bring the potential to explore Gu-Reum as someone caught in the crossfire between duty and morals over the course of the drama, who learns to becomes stronger as a consequence of her enmity towards Zi O.

Instead, Gu Reum seemed to have been a female lead drawn into this unexplained cliche of having an inferiority complex against her male associates in early episodes before being completed reverted into a “ damsel in distress” who faints, or gets clunked over the head by an object in the later storyline . Da Hee certainly was quite a good actress in the show, however, it was hard to take her role seriously when her character transitioned from intelligent cop to unintentional comic relief in seconds flat , especially due to with her relationship with Zi O.

The “ enemy to lovers” is a popular trope amongst dramas and given the right storyline and characterisation, this can work incredibly well. Yet, “ L.U.C.A; The Beginning”’s problem can be found by the sudden and illogical transition from Gu Reum being at Zi O’s throat in early episodes and Zi O “ accidentally” pushing her around with his powers, to Gi Reum suddenly eloping and holding his hand affectionately like a shy school girl not even several episodes later . If you think it can’t get worse than this between the two characters and their “ affections”, then (without any spoilers), it is important to confirm that it certainly does. Although this was necessary to the storyline, there’s little sense of actually building up the characters , let alone pairing them off from enemies to lovers in nearly seconds flat.

Whilst the pacing of the show was quick in parts, a major issue with its sudden fast-pacing can be found through the myriad of plot inconsistencies which arose throughout the drama. Whilst there are some evident reasons explained in the plot behind this, it naturally draws more concern how Zi O, a mutant who has never been registered for official residence was able to not to be caught as a figure of interest amongst CCTV footage after initial reports in the past as well as not legally queried over his job entitlement as well. Whilst minor, it often subjugated the drama’s “ unintelligent violence” without deeper meaning, or at least unique film techniques to make these fight sequences more than a brawl, but fine art.

Arguably our show has several “ main antagonists”, however, the most reoccurring and prominent “ puppet working for the brains” in the series appears as the gruff former-solider Lee Son ( Kim Sung Oh).With an interesting and personal motive behind the reason for getting back at Zi O, Lee Son had the potential to be a fairly well-crafted, Machiavellian antagonist with actual depth due to his experiences in the field and profounder reasons for working for nefarious scientist Ryu Joong Kwon ( Ahn Nae Sang). Instead, Lee Son turns more into the classic “ brainless and inhuman combatant ” than a worthwhile or interesting opponent, often resulting in his actions coming off as more “annoying” than “baleful” .

On the other hand, the one character in the show who was surprisingly intriguing came in the form of Choi Yoo Na ( Jung Da Eun). Although Da Eun hasn’t received as much credibility in performances as some of her costars , she did surprisingly capture interest within her well-performed role as the mysterious and laidback Yoo Na; a young woman who became a field agent for Jong Kwon’s organisation after the initial operation upon her leg ( as shown in the first episode). Yet like most side characters out there, Yoo Na didn’t really have the opportunity for viewers to see her character grow or deepen over the course or the series.

Meanwhile, the ending of the show took a cliffhanger approach rather than particularly “ bittersweet” or “ happy”- appropriate for the genre, but nevertheless a little disjointed and arguably anticlimactic rather than an ending which felt complete and worthwhile.

“ L.U.C.A; The Beginning” can probably be seen as the epitome of the recent problem of “ throwaway” dramas emerging out of the action genre in South-Korea. With notable recent predecessors such as “ Alice” (2020) and “RUGAL” (2020) also suffering from the same fate of being high-budget extravaganzas, but often lacking screenwriting quality , it is probably fair to say that “ L.U.C.A; The Beginning” is the type of show to watch if you’re bored and want to binge-watch something with mindless violence without a second thought . However, “ L.U.C.A; The Beginning” greatly suffers from its own demise as a memorable and well-written show due to poor characterisation, miscasting, plot inconsistencies, deeper meaning and plot incoherency as well. A shame for a drama which had potential to be one of the best dramas of 2021 .

Leia Mais

Esta resenha foi útil para você?

Recomendações

Desperto
Rugal
Círculo
O Imortal
A Bruxa: Parte 1. A Subversão
O Mito de Sísifo

Detalhes

  • Drama: L.U.C.A.: O Começo
  • País: Coreia do Sul
  • Episódios: 12
  • Exibido: Fev 1, 2021 - Mar 9, 2021
  • Exibido On: Segunda, Terça
  • Original Network: tvN
  • Duração: 1 hr. 15 min.
  • Classificação do Conteúdo: 15+ - 15 anos ou mais

Estatísticas

  • Pontuação: 7.3 (avaliado por 4,702 usuários)
  • Classificado: #7179
  • Popularidade: #1210
  • Fãs: 14,270

Principais Contribuidores

edições 143
edições 30
edições 27
edições 23

Notícias e artigos

Listas populares

Listas relacionadas de usuários
Short KDrama
2104 titles 450 loves 15
tvN Dramas
328 titles 187 loves
Onde assistir?
6453 titles 81 loves 2

Assistido recentemente por